Vespa

December 26, 2016

2016 Piaggio P.1HH unmanned aircraft

Welcome Vespa mopeds were made in Italy by Piaggio. Vespa is a division of Piaggio, like Chevrolet is a division of General Motors. Sometimes the bikes are called “Vespa” and sometimes they are called “Piaggio”. Both names are correct.

History: Founded by Rinaldo Piaggio in 1884, Piaggio first made railroad locomotives. In WWI and WWII they made military aircraft. They still do make aircraft and many other machines. After WWII they transitioned to civilian necessities, like motor scooters. The first Piaggio Vespa scooters had front suspension made from a light airplane landing gear. The first scooter wheels were aircraft wheels and tires. The stamped sheet metal body-frame was an aircraft design. They were named Vespa, which means “wasp” in Italian, because the two-stroke engine sounded like a wasp. The superior designs made the products light, efficient, affordable, convenient and safe. Soon Vespa became a worldwide motor vehicle manufacturer. By the 1970’s the name Vespa became synonymous with motor-scooter, like Coke is with caramel flavored soda, or Kleenex is with facial tissue. Read more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piaggio

From about 1968 to 1975 Vespa mopeds were imported to the US and distributed by Western Scooter Distributors, 1599 Custer Ave, San Francisco CA 94124.

From about 1976 to 1985 they were imported and distributed by Vespa of America Corporation, National Headquarters, 355 Valley Dr, Brisbane CA 94005.

 

Here are Myrons Mopeds old info sheet handouts. They were black and white copies on paper.

Info Vespa 1

Info Vespa 1

Info Vespa 3

Info Vespa 3

Info Vespa 2

Info Vespa 2

Info Vespa 4

Info Vespa 4

Info Vespa 5

Info Vespa 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Contents:   1. Vespa Mopeds
Contents:   2. Parts Manuals 
Contents:   3. Electrical Parts
Contents:   3a. Electrical Service

 

 


1. Vespa Mopeds (US models 1968-1985)

Model Codes: “/B” in the model code means “with Blinkers” (turn signals and battery boxes). “E” means “Elastique” (front suspension), “N” means No front suspension. “V” means “Variatore” (variable speed transmission)

1968-71 Vespa Mopeds:

The beloved Vespa Ciao (pronounced “chow”) was first introduced to America by this ad from 1968. The model shown in this ad looks like a European model, with no brake light, no side reflectors and no electric horn. The ad says it is approved for highway use and comes in five colors. The C9N and C9E had 19 inch rims. The C7N and C7E had 17 inch rims.

1967 Vespa Ciao C9N1

1968 Vespa Ciao C9E1

1967-69 Models

C9N1 Ciao
C9E1 Ciao
C9V1 Ciao

 

 

 

 

1971 Vespa Ciao C7N1

1971 Vespa Ciao C7N1/B

1970-71 Models

C7N1 Ciao Standard
C7N1/B Ciao Standard (with blinkers)
C7E1 Ciao Special
C7E1/B Ciao Special (with blinkers)

 

 

 

1972-75 Vespa Mopeds:

1972 Vespa Ciao C7E1T

1973 Vespa Ciao C7N1T

1974 Vespa Ciao C7E1T/B

1972-75 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme

 

 

 

New for 1972: The CEV (round) tail light that shines straight back, changed to the CEV 9350 type (oval with flat sides) that also shines to the sides, as required by new 1972 US safety standards for on-road motorcycles.

New for 1974: First documented human crossing of the United States coast to coast on a moped. Richard Hartnett rode a Vespa Ciao 2617 miles on just 16.5 gallons of gas, from Jacksonville FL to San Diego CA, in 11 days. Western Scooter Distributors honored him at a luncheon in San Francisco, in this early ad from Vespa of America Corp.

New for 1976: New US safety standards specifically for mopeds. Before 1976 there were no US safety standards for mopeds. There were only motorcycle and bicycle safety standards. The brake levers did not need to have ball ends. The front brake on C7N was not a drum brake. But the 1972-75 bikes did already have USA-required brake light and side reflectors. The new US safety standards were like opening the flood gates, as the US became flooded with mopeds from Motobecane, Peugeot, Tomos, Batavus, Puch, Garelli and many more. Piaggio had already been selling mopeds for about eight years.

1976-77 Vespa Mopeds:

Vespa Flyer 77 p1

1977 C7E1T, C7E1T/B, EEV1T/B

Vespa Flyer 77 p5

Vespa Flyer 1977

Vespa Flyer 77 p6

Vespa 1977

 

1976 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme

 

 

 

 

1977 Vespa EEV1T, C7V3T, EEV1T/B, C7E1T, C7E1T/B, C7N1T

 

1977 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme
C7V3T Ciao Super
EEV1T Bravo Deluxe
EEV1T/B Bravo Super Deluxe

 

 

Vespa Ciao

Ciao C7E1T/B

Ciao Specs

Ciao Specs

Vespa Bravo

Bravo EEV1T

Bravo Specs

Bravo Specs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Info Vespa 6

Vespa Mopeds Specifications

Info Vespa 7

Vespa Mopeds Speed Versions Info

Speed Versions: Other than a small sticker on the sub-frame that says “30”, “25,” or “20” it is not easy to tell what speed it is supposed to go. The lower speed bikes have smaller carbs, ports, exhausts, and lower gearing, and possibly other devices to be compliant with each state’s moped speed limit. This spreadsheet of part numbers and notes, condensed from the various Piaggio parts catalogs, explains the differences between the models and the speed versions.

 

 

 

 

 

1978-79 Vespa Mopeds

Vespa Folder left

Vespa 1978 left

Vespa 1978 right

Vespa 1978 right

Vespa Grande 1

1978 Grande 048

Vespa Grande 2

1978 Grande 048/B

Grande Specs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1978 Vespa Grande 048

1978 Vespa Ciao C7E1T-B

1978 Vespa Ciao C7N1T

1978 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme
C7V3T Ciao Super
EEV1T Bravo Deluxe
EEV1T/B Bravo Super Deluxe
048 Grande Deluxe
048/B Grande Super Deluxe

New for 1978:
The Grande model was introduced to USA only. It is a two-person heavy duty design. It’s twin long tube gas tanks, which are part of the frame, are too long and thin to allow oil mixing in the bike’s tank. Instead the gas and oil must be pre-mixed in a gas can before adding to the bike’s tank.  

The turn-signals-with-battery versions of Ciao and Bravo have a new electrical wiring and components. Instead of an external ignition ground, where the ignition source coil powers the brake light, they have an internal ignition ground. The following components are different: wiring, brake light switches, tail light, aux. lights source coil. Now the engine never looses spark because of disconnected brake light wires.

The 1978-80 Bravo tail lamp is identical to the 1977 one, except that it does not have a secret brake light resistor inside. The 1978 with internal ignition ground does not need the resistor, but the 1977 with external ignition ground does. If you put a 1977 Bravo tail light on a 1978, the brake light will be dim. If you put a 1978 tail light on a 1977, the brake light will be super bright, and soon burn out causing loss of spark. Weird… 

1979 Vespa Grande 048

1979 Vespa Si SIV1T

1979 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme
C7V3T Ciao Super
EEV1T Bravo Deluxe
EEV1T/B Bravo Super Deluxe
048 Grande
048/B Grande
048 Grande (with mag wheels)
048/B Grande (with mags)
SIV1T Si

New for 1979:
The new model “Si” was introduced. “Si” means “yes”. It was more modern, with monoshock rear suspension. The Si had 4-ray type “mag” wheels, cast aluminum, made by Piaggio.

After 1979 all Grande models had Razze Incrociate “snowflake” mag wheels, made by Grimeca. The much stronger cast aluminum wheels resisted bending, and never had broken spokes.

 

1980 Grande 048/B

1980 Vespa Grande 048

1980 Vespa Si SIV1T

1980 Models

C7N1T Ciao Standard
C7E1T Ciao Special
C7E1T/B Ciao Supreme
C7V3T Ciao Super
EEV1T Bravo Deluxe
EEV1T/B Bravo Super Deluxe
048 Grande
048/B Grande
SIV1T Si

1982 Vespa Ciao PX

1980 Vespa Ciao PX

 

New for 1980-81: The Ciao C7E is modernized to the Ciao PX. The 1970’s Domino “chrome” controls become 1980’s Domino black type. The tail light became flat and tucked in under the luggage rack so it is less vulnerable to breakage. The headlight became grey plastic with a built-in switch, the light grey side covers became dark grey. 

The Ciao C7N and C7V are discontinued.

 

 

1981 Piaggio Grande MX with oil injection, left 068/B, right 068

1981-83 Models

C7E1T Ciao PX
C7E1T/B Ciao PX
068 Grande MX
068/B Grande MX
SIV1T Si

Unlike the Ciao PX, the Grande did not say MX anywhere on it. So the MX suffix became unused and forgotten.

 

1982 Grande MX 068/B

New for 1981:
– Oil injection, on the Grande and Si. No more mixing of 1 part oil and 50 parts gas.
– I
nternal ignition ground. No more loss of spark if the brake light wires are loose.
17-digit VIN number, no more Veglia speedometer, only CEV.
– N
o more “bullet” headlight on /B models, no more chrome, only black.
– N
ew black Bravo-type tail light, more black and less gray things, like cables.
– N
ew key switch, wiring and brake light switches on blinker /B models.

 

 

1984 Vespa Si SIV1T

1982 Vespa Si SIV1T

1984-85 Models

SIV1T Si
SIV2T Si (electronic ignition)

 

The final years 1983-85:
In an effort to reduce air pollution, in 1983 the US Environmental Protection Agency made it illegal to sell new two-stroke street motorcycles over 50cc. The powerful 350 to 750cc Yamaha, Suzuki and Kawasaki sport motorcycles that dominated US streets in the late 60’s and 70’s, all had to have 4-stroke engines. Mopeds and 50cc street motorcycles were exempt. 
Piaggio chose to abandon the US market, rather that change it’s two-stroke 100-200cc scooter engines to 4-stroke. 

Piaggio left the USA in the mid 1980’s. There were some 1984-85 Piaggio Si mopeds sold then, but no more classic two-stroke Vespa scooters after 1983. By 1983 sales of Vespa mopeds were low, thanks to low gas prices and low-cost mopeds and scooters from Honda and Yamaha. The Japanese scooters like Honda Elite 80 and Elite 125/150 had four-stroke engines, US compliant. By the end of the 1980’s well made Japanese scooters were common on US streets. 

For over 15 years the USA did not have any new Piaggio vehicle sales. Then in the early 2000’s Piaggio returned to the US with completely redesigned modern 4-stroke scooters, but no mopeds.   

 

 

 


2. Parts Catalogs (US models 1968-1985)

The Piaggio parts catalogs were well made, well illustrated printed notebooks. When things changed, instead of making whole new parts books, they made parts book amendments. The amendments only contained the parts that changed.

1969 Piaggio 153724
Ciao parts catalog 153483 amendment

1970-71 Piaggio 154232
Ciao Boxer parts catalog

1971-72 Piaggio 154488
Ciao C7N C9N
154232 amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1972-75 Piaggio 170534 Ciao parts catalog

1976-77 Piaggio 171371 Ciao Bravo parts catalog

1978-80 Piaggio SRV/30
Ciao Bravo
171371 amendment #2

1981-83 Piaggio SRV/59
Ciao PX 
 171371 amendment #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1978-79 Piaggio 171716
Grande parts catalog

1979-80 Piaggio SRV/46
Grande with mags
171716 amendment #1

1981 Piaggio SRV/48
Grande MX 068 
171716 amendment #2

1979-80 Piaggio Vespa
Si parts catalog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3. Electrical Parts

Original ignition parts are “Facet”

This table of Piaggio part numbers contains most electrical parts on most US models.

Abbreviations:

For switches, N.C. means “Normally Closed”     N.O. means “Normally Open”

For brake light switches,

NCI means “Normally Closed when Installed” (normally open not installed)

NOI means “Normally Open when Installed” (normally closed not installed) 

 

Vespa
mopeds >
USA
models
72-75
Ciao
C7E1T
C7N1T
C7V1T
76-77
Ciao
78-80
Ciao C7E1T
1977
Bravo
78-80
Bravo EEV1T
78-80
Grande
048
79-85
Si
SIV1T
80-83
Grande
MX
068
81-83
Ciao PX
C7E1T
72-75
Ciao
C7E1T/B
76-77
Ciao
C7E1T/B
Bravo
EEV1T/B
78-80
Ciao
C7E1T/B
Bravo
EEV1T/B
78-80
Grande
048/B
80-83
Grande
MX

068/B
Electrical
Version >
turn
signals
turn
signals
turn
signals
turn
signals
turn
signals
points 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133 103133
condenser 144241 102939 102939 102939 102939 102939 102939 152440 162935 162935 162935 162935
ignition
source coil
120391
external
ground
120391
external
ground
120391
external
ground
120391
external
ground
189813
external
ground
120391
external
ground
212403
external
ground
120391
external
ground
162933
external
ground
185047
internal
ground
162933
external
ground
185047
internal
ground
ignition
spark coil
143062 143062
132299
124830
132299
132299 132299 132299 132299 143062 132299 132299 132299 132299
spark plug
NGK #
121908 143541
B5HS
143541
B5HS
137776
B6HS
A15029 137776
B6HS
143541
B5HS
121908 143541
B5HS
143541
B5HS
143541
B5HS
137776
B6HS
flywheel 103485 103485 103485 103485 176418 103485 176418 103485 148125 148125 148125 148125
lights coil 120397 120397 120397 120397 189812 120397 214547 120397 162929 162929 162929 162929
aux. coil none none none none none none none none 162930 185048 162930 185048
main key
switch
143972 none none none none none none 152453 147556
162912
162912 162912 307872
brake light
switches
connection
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126938
NCI in
series
126899
NOI in
parallel
126938
NCI in
series
126899
NOI in
parallel
horn switch
CEV #
128598
N.O
156645
N.O.
8040
156645
N.O.
8040
307113
N.O.
8188
189834
N.O.
Grabor
307113
N.O.
8188
213516
N.O.
128598
N.O.
163376
N.C.
163376
N.C.
307264
N.C.
8192
307297
N.C.
Grabor
run switch
type
CEV #
147305
N.O.
8177
147305
N.O.
8177
147305
N.O.
8177
307114
N.O.
8189
189833
N.O.
Grabor
307114
N.O.
8189
307263
N.O.
8191
307263
N.O.
8191
turn switch none none none none none none none 144474
CEV188
147304
163377
147304
163377
307263
8191
307263
8191
tail light
CEV #
color
142805
4350
chrome
142805
4350
chrome
142805
185028
4400.2
307162
4350
chrome
187583
CEV234
black
307877
4400
black
189054
Becar
black
142805
4350
chrome
142805
4350
chrome
185026
4400
grey
307162
4350
chrome
307877
4400
black
head light
CEV #
color
145107

grey
156729

grey
307110
2143
chrome
307868
2143
black
147554
162909
grey
307262
2139V
chrome
307868
2143
black

 

102939 $10

103133 $18

120391 $70

120397 $55

 

 

 

 

 

126899 = CEV 9343

126938 = CEV 9342

126939 $2

128598 $10

See Switches

 

 

 

 

142805, 307162 = CEV 9350 N/A

144474 $10

147304 $15

 

 

 

 

 

 

147305 $45
CEV 8177

148125 $75

156645 $25
CEV 8040

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

161395

162909

 

 

 

 

 

 

162929 $55

162930 $70

162933 N/A

162935 N/A (bad one shown)

 

Special magneto generator parts for turn signal models.

 

185026 $60
CEV 9400 grey

185028 $65
CEV 9400.2 grey

185048 N/A

 

Special parts for turn signal models.

See Tail lights

 

 

 

187893 N/A

189054 N/A

189833  $45 Si switch

192930 $45 Si lens

 

 

 

 

 

307113 $13
= CEV 8188

307114 $30
= CEV 8189

307262 N/A
= CEV 2139V

 

 

 

 

 

 

307263 $15
= CEV 8191

307264 $25
= CEV 8192

307297
Grabor

 

 

 

 

 

 

307872  N/A

307877 N/A
 CEV 9400 black

 

307xxx parts for Grande.

See Tail lights

 

 

 

 


4. Electrical Service

Magneto-Generator and Engine Wires

Top coil is ignition source coil. One end (red with eyelet) goes to the points. The other end goes to ground, either internally or externally.

Bottom coil is lights source coil. One end is grounded internally. The other end (with red plug) goes to the main lights.

Side coil is auxiliary lights, only on turn signal models. Both ends go to a rectifier for battery charging.

1976-80 Vespa Ciao

1978-80 Vespa Grande

1978-80 Vespa Grande
with turn signals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vespa Ciao with blinkers, ignition wire behind points is corroded badly

Bad wires: 1970’s Vespa moped wires are often corroded badly. They all have faded brittle insulation that breaks in places, exposing the braided copper core. Here is a turn signal model Ciao with a vital wire shorting out secretly behind the points. All of the wires near the engine are cracked and corroded badly, in places. They break like glass when you try to bend them.

 

 

 

Vespa Ciao with blinkers, brittle and badly corroded condenser wires

Bad wires: The bad wire shown above is this condenser wire. This is a turn signal model Ciao, with the condenser mounted externally. Non-turn-signal models have internal mounted condensers. This poor wire is actively shedding green flakes of copper oxides. Also note that the blue wire (external ignition ground) is faded to dark grey. It is also cracked open and corroding. Both of these wires are needed to run.

 

 

 

Replacing engine wires: Many 1970’s Vespa mopeds need their engine wires replaced. Many have intermittent or no spark, or dim or flickering lights, because of bad wires. Some electronic or hardware stores sell braided copper wire by the foot, but some only have 50 ft rolls. The old connectors can be cleaned and re-soldered to the new wire. That requires good flux-core solder and some skill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Under construction …