Tires and Tubes

September 9, 2012

Tubes

374608 tube 2.25/2.50 – 14                  $8    wt 10 oz = 0.63 lb

374609 tube 2.75/3.00 – 14                $10    wt 12 oz = 0.63 lb

374616 tube 2.00/2.25 – 16                  $8    wt 11 oz = 0.69 lb

374617 tube 2.25/2.50 – 16                   $9   wt 12 oz = 0.75 lb

374618 tube 2.75/3.00 – 16                 $11    wt 13 oz = 0.81 lb

374620 tube 3.25/3.50 – 16                 $12    wt 17 oz = 1.06 lb

374626  tube 2.00/2.25 – 17                  $9    wt 13 oz = 0.81 lb

374627  tube 2.25/2.50 – 17                $10    wt 13.5  = 0.84 lb

374628  tube 2.75/3.00 – 17                $12    wt 17 oz = 1.06 lb  

374633  tube 2.25/2.50 – 18                $12    wt 15 oz = 0.94 lb

374639  tube 2.25/2.50 – 19                $12    wt 15 oz = 0.94 lb

 

Welcome. Myrons Mopeds Tire Department is unique in that it covers the overlap region between bicycle tires and motorcycle tires. The widest bicycle tires can fit some motorcycles, and the thinnest motorcycle tires can fit some bicycles. But the meaning of “size” is not the same. Bicycle tires use the outer tire diameter to mean the size, while motorcycle tires use the inner tire diameter to mean the size. So a 16″ bicycle tire fits completely inside a 16″ motorcycle tire. See below.

To clear up the confusion of multiple meanings of “tire size”, this Tire Department groups the tires by rim size.

 


 Tires

14 inch rim (356 mm)     

14-1 tire 2.25-14
Kenda K261
VL141-801410
classic street $30
weight 3.19 lb

14-4 tire 2.75-14 Shinko SR241 WP122-874440 classic trail $45

14-4  2.75-14
Shinko SR241
WP162-874440
classic trail $45
weight 4.9 lb

This 1981 Honda NC50 Express has 14" rims. Tires say "2.25 - 14"

This 1981 Honda NC50
Express has 14″ rims.
Tires say “2.25 – 14”

Fourteen inch rims are pretty much only on mopeds and kid’s off road bikes. Bicycles have rims 12 (16 tire), 16 (20 tire), 18 (22 tire), 20 (24 tire), 22 (26 tire), 24 (28 tire) inch, and many others, but not 14. Instead the 18″ bicycle tire fits a 13.2 inch rim, not 14.0.

 

 

 

 

 


15 inch rim (381 mm) 

15-1 tire 2.50-15 Shinko SR241 WP122-874452 classic trail $40 special order item

15-1 tire 2.50-15
Shinko SR241
WP122-874452
classic trail $45
special order

This 1973 Yamaha GT1 80cc has 15" rims, with "2.50 - 15" trail tires.

This 1973 Yamaha GT1
(80cc) has 15″ rims, with
“2.50 – 15” trail tires.

Wide tires for 15 inch rims are common on modern street motorcycles, like “130/90 -15” (5 inch wide) to “170/80 – 15” (6 1/2 inch wide), but thin 15’s are uncommon. Size “2.50 – 15” (2 1/2 inch wide) is pretty much only found on 1970’s small trail bikes by Yamaha, Kawasaki, and others.  No bicycles have that 381mm rim size. So there’s only this one choice. 

 

 

 

 

 


16 inch rim (406 mm) 

16-2 tire 2.00- 16
Vee Rubber 087
 TL181-VRM087
classic street $30
weight 2.6 lb

3 tire 2.25-16 Shinko SR714

16-3 tire 2.25-16
Shinko SR714
WP191-874550
modern street   $25
weight 3.63 lb

2.25-16 Kenda K260

16-5 tire 2.25-16
Kenda K260
JB122-59752
classic street $30
weight 4.13 lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This 1980 Tomos Bullet has 16" rims. Tires say "2.25 - 16"

This 1980 Tomos Bullet has 16″ rims. ’70’s tires said “20×2.25″ and also said “2.25 – 16″

 

Tires for sixteen inch rims are on about 1/3 of all USA mopeds, while 17″ is the other 2/3. Almost all Italian mopeds use 16″ rims, with mostly 2.25 – 16 (20.5″ OD) tires. Juvenile and BMX bicycles all use 16 inch rims, but they are called 20″ in the bicycle industry. Yes, 20 x 2.125 bicycle tires interchange with 2.25 – 16 motorcycle tires, because they both use 406mm rims. Motorcycle tires for on-road use have to meet US DOT standards, and have many things labeled on the tire. Bicycle tires have different safety standards, and are not legal and not safe to use on on-road motorcycles.  

 

6 tire 2.50-16 Pirelli ML75

16-11 tire 2.50-16
Pirelli ML75
WP163-8715062
modern street $55
weight 4.06 lb

7 tire 2.50-16 Bridgestone TW9

16-12 tire 2.50-16
Bridgestone TW9
TR164-300726
modern trail $55
weight 3.50 lb

8 tire 2.50-16 Vee Rubber VRM021

16-13 tire 2.50-16
Vee Rubber 219
VL152-815113
classic trail $45
weight 4.25 lb

9 tire 2.75-16 knobby

16-15  2.75-16
Yokohama
DI151-029828
off road     $20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 tire 2.75-16 Pirelli ML75

16-17 tire 2.75-16
Pirelli ML75
WP114-8715063
modern  $55 weight 4.25 lb

16-20 tire 3.00-16
Shinko SR244
WP1132-874401
modern trail $40
weight 6.31 lb

80-80 - 16 Shinko SR741

16-21 tire 80/80-16
3.2″ wide=3.00-16
Shinko SR714
WP1113-874430
modern street $45
weight 5.9 lb

90-80 - 16 Shinko SR741

16-22 tire 90/80-16
3.5″ wide=3.25-16
Shinko SR714
WP1123-874431
modern street $50
weight 6.5 lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sava 3.25-16 is 3.6″ total width. It is the back tire on Tomos Streetmate and Revival mopeds. The Shinko 90/80-16 replaces it, but has a lower profile, which lowers the back of the bike a little, and lowers the gearing slightly.

The Sava 2.50-17 is 2.7″ total width. So some tires are wider than the size says, because there is a shoulder where the tread goes wider than the sidewall.


17 inch rim (432 mm) 


17-1 tire 2.00-17
Vee Rubber 126
TL181-
classic street $30
weight 2.8 lb


17-2 tire 2.00-17
IRC NR58
TL102-
classic  $30
weight 2.90 lb

14 2.25-17 Kenda K261

17-3 tire 2.25-17
Kenda K260
VL171-801220
classic street $25
weight 4.00 lb

17-3 tire 2.25-17 Cheng Shin C109 TR611-6800?? classic street $35

17-4 tire 2.25-17
Cheng Shin C109
TR011-680025 
classic   $30
only 1 left

This 1969 Puch Maxi has 17" rims. Original tires said "21 x 2.0"

This 1969 Puch Maxi
has 17″ rims. Original
’60’s tires said “21 x 2.0”
’70’s also said “2.00 -17”
Notice 17 = 21 – 2*2.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 tire 2.25-17 IRC NR21

17-5 tire 2.25-17 IRC NR21
TR161-321171
center ridge  $25
weight 2.63 lb

16 tire 2.25-17 Shinko SR704

17-6 tire 2.25-17
Shinko SR704
WP161-874540
classic street  $25
weight 3.25 lb

18 tire 2.25-17 Michelin M62

17-8 tire 2.25-17
Michelin M62
WP122-879388
heavy duty $40
weight 4.50 lb

20 tire 2.50-17 Michelin M62

17-11    2.50-17
Michelin M62
WP132-879389
heavy duty $40
weight 4.75 lb

22 tire 2.50-17 Vee Rubber VRM021

17-13 tire 2.50-17
Vee Rubber 021
VL182-815115
classic trail $40
weight 4.44 lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17-14 tire 2.50-17
Shinko SR244
WP112-874402
modern trail $40
weight 4.88 lb

17-15 tire 2.50-17 Shinko SR241 WP142-874442 classic trail $40

17-15 tire 2.50-17
Shinko SR241
WP112-874442
classic trail $40
weight 4.81 lb

17-xx tire 2.75-17 Michelin M62 WP171-879380 heavy duty $35

17-20 tire 2.75-17
Michelin M62
WP122-879380
heavy duty $45
weight 5.69 lb

23 tire 2.75-17 IRC TR1

17-21 tire 2.75-17
IRC TR1 Trial
TR182-322173
classic trail  $50
weight 5.06 lb

24 tire 2.75-17 IRC NR21

17-22   2.75-17
IRC NR21
TR113-321173
street tire $55
weight 4.81 lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


18 inch rim (456 mm)             

This 1962 Motobecane AV48 had 19" or 18" rims, with "23 x 2.0" or "22-1/2 x 2-1/4" Hutchinson tires. Notice 19 = 23 - 2*2 and 18 = 22.5-2*2.25

This 1962 Motobecane
AV48 had 19″ or 18″
rims, with “23 x 2.0” or
“22-1/2 x 2-1/4” tires.
Notice 19 = 23 – 2*2
and 18 = 22.5-2*2.25

This '69 Tomos Colibri 14V had 18" rims, with "23 x 2.5" tires. Notice 18 = 23 - 2*2.5

This 1969 Tomos Colibri
14V has 18″ rims,
with “23 x 2.5” tires.
Notice 18 = 23 – 2*2.5
Pre-1969  had 19″ rims,
with “23 x 2.25” tires.

22 x 1.75 bicycle tire on a 1965 Harley Davidson M50

22 x 1.75 bicycle tire on a 1967 Harley Davidson M65

Some 1960’s tires were labeled narrower than modern tires. The Harley Davidson M65 original tires said 22 x 1 3/4 (1.75 – 18), but they were actually 2.00 or 2.25 in width. You can see the restored M65 rear tire is thinner than the rim. Yet in old photos the tires are wider than the rims.

The 2.25-18 motorcycle tire is a better choice. For 2.25-18 tires, see treatland.tv.

 

 

18-1 tire 2.50-18 Kenda K203 JB103-59753 ribbed $50

18-4 tire 2.50-18
Kenda K203
JB142-59753
rib     $45
weight 4.59 lb

32 tire 2.50-18 IRC NR2

18-5 tire 2.50-18
IRC NR2
TR122-321183
classic     $40
weight 4.6 lb

30 tire 2.75-18 Michelin M62

18-8 tire 2.75-18
Michelin M62
WP122-879382
heavy duty $45
weight 5.75 lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


19 inch rim (484 mm)

Many vintage motorized bicycles had 19 inch rims, with (now obsolete) bicycle tires size 23 x 2.0 (equal to 2.0 – 19 or French 550 x 50B). By the 1970’s, tires were smaller and wider, 16 and 17 inch. Of the US model mopeds, only the Solex had 19″ rims. 19 inch tires thinner than 2.75 are not sold by normal USA motorcycle or bicycle tire suppliers. The thinnest “metric street” tire available is 80/90 – 19, which is about 2.75 – 19.

This 1956 Sparta FP50 has 19" rims, with "23 x 2.0" tires

This 1956 Sparta
FP50 has 19″ rims,
with “23 x 2.0” tires

This '59 Wards Riverside (MB AV88) has 19" rims. Originals said "23 x 2.0"

This ’59 Wards Riverside (MB AV88) has 19″ rims.
Originals said “23 x 2.0”

This '63 Sears Allstate has 19" rims. Original tires said "23 x 2.25"

This 1963 Sears Allstate
has 19″ rims. Original
tires said “23 x 2.25”

This '62 Tomos Colibri T12 has 19" rims, with "23 x 2.25" tires.

1962 Tomos Colibri
T12 has 19″ rims,
with “23 x 2.25” tires.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-1 tire 1.75 – 19
Hutchinson 21B
TL172-Nervure
for friction drive
flat top $45
actually 2.00-19

19-2 tire 2.25 – 19
Mitas M02
TL102-M02
 classic street $35

This 1966 Solex 3800 has 19″ rims. Tires say 1.75-19 but they’re actually 2 inch wide, 2.00-19

This 2000 Solex 3800, an Impex remake, has 19″ rims with 1.75-19 tires.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


20 inch rim (507 mm) 

20-1 tire 2.12-20 Kenda 927 Sun JB101-60412 (24x2.125) $15 special order item

20-1 tire 2.12-20
K927  bicycle
JB190-60412
(24×2.125) $15
special order

This 1955 Sparta FP50 has 20" rims, with "24 x 2.0" tires

This 1955 Sparta
FP50 has 20″ rims,
with “24 x 2.0” tires

This 1952 Motobecane AV32 has 20" rims. Orig tires say "600x50B Michelin 24x1-1/2 x 2" Notice 20 = 24 - 2*2.0

This 1952 Motobecane
AV32 has 20″ rims.
Orig tires say “600x50B
Michelin 24×1-1/2 x 2″
Notice 20 = 24 – 2*2.0

Some vintage motorized bicycles had 20 inch rims, that accept bicycle size 24 x 2.125 “balloon” tires. For them, fat bicycle tires, for a mini beach cruiser, are an affordable option. Street classic tread all black is shown, but other choices exist. Whitewall 24 x 2.125 available also. Most bicycle shops carry 24×2.125 tires also. The ISO number on every bicycle tire is what tells the rim size. This tire says 57-507, which means 57mm wide (2.24″) and 507mm (20.0″) inner diameter. 

 

 

 


21 inch rim (534 mm) 

This 1985 Derbi RD50 has a 21" front rim, with a "2.50 - 21" tire

This 1985 Derbi RD50
has a 21″ front rim,
with a “2.50 – 21” tire

Twenty one is a common front rim size on off road and street cruiser motorcycles. The thinnest street tire is 80/90-21, which equals 2.75-21. The thinnest off road commonly available is also 2.75 – 21. Vintage French bicycles had 21″ rims with “600B” or “24 x 1-1/2” tires, but not modern bicycles.

Any rim can be measured to determine the bead diameter, where the tire sits. One way is to wrap a cloth measuring tape around the tire-less rim to measure the circumference, then divide by 3.14. See Sheldon Brown Rim Measuring for more details.  

 

 

 


22 inch rim (559 mm) 

22-1 tire 2.12-22 C121 bicycle JB101-60720 (26x2.125) $15 special order item

22-1 tire 2.12-22
CST C121 bicycle
JB111-60720
(26×2.125) $20
special order item

This 1955 Lambretta moped has 22" rims, 26x2.125 bicycle tires

This 1955 Lambretta
has 22″ rims that take
26×2.125 bicycle tires.
Originals said “22×2.0”
Notice 22 = 26 – 2*2.0

Some vintage motorized bicycles had 22 inch rims, that accept bicycle size 26 x 2.125 “balloon” tires. For them, wide bicycle tires, for a beach cruiser or mountain bike, are an affordable option. Street classic tread all black is shown, but other choices exist. Whitewall 26 x 2.125 available also. Most bicycle shops carry 26×2.125 tires also. The ISO number on every bicycle tire is what tells the rim size. This tire says 57-559, which means 57mm wide (2.24″) and 559mm (22.0″) inner diameter. For more about tire sizes see Sheldon Brown Tyre Sizing. Bicycle tires are intended for low speed and low weight. They have no motor vehicle safety endorsements, like “street-legal” or “DOT” tires do. They are listed here to show what all the choices are. But they are not recomended for use on motor vehicles. 

 

 


23 inch rim (584 mm) 

This 1954 Mercier has 23" rims, 650B tires.

This 1954 Mercier has
23″ rims with 650B tires.
650 is the outer diameter.
B is the width, 33mm.
Note 584 = 650 – 2*33

This 1949 Solex has 23" rims with "650B" or "26 x 1-1/2" tires. Notice 23 = 26 - 2*1.5

This 1949 Solex has
23″ rims with “650B”
or “26 x 1-1/2” tires.
Notice 23 = 26 – 2*1.5

Twenty three inch rims are on antique motorcycles, and on some off road front, and also some on road front customs for novelty. Modern downhill mountain bike racers use 23 inch rims, called “27.5 x 2.0”. 1950’s French bicycles use 23″ rims, called “650B” or “26 x 1-1/2”. Some modern commuter bikes also use 650B tires (584mm rim), in-between a mountain bike 26″ (559mm) and road bike 700C (622mm).  Antique motorcycles from the 1910’s, 20’s, 30’s use the bicycle system, where the tire size means the outer diameter. So, at least some 28 x 2.5 tires correspond to 2.50 – 23, but maybe not all. A 28 x 2.5 or 28 x 3.0 antique replica tire costs around $200 and up from Coker Tire. Measure the rim diameter precisely to determine the rim size, on any vintage, antique, or unknown motorcycle. A 23-inch-rim tire costs ten times as much as a 22-inch-rim tire!

 


24 inch rim (610 mm) 

For some reason, there are no bicycles or motorcycles, except for some antique ones possibly, with 24″ rims. If there were any antique motorcycles with “28 x 2.0” or “29 x 2.5″ tires, they likely had 24” rims. Most early motorcycle tires were “28 x 2.5″, assumed to be a 23” rim, or “28 x 3.0″, assumed to be a 22” rim. 

 


25 inch rim (635 mm) 

This 1940 Solex has 25" rims, with "700B" or "28 x 1-1/2" tires. Notice 28 = 25 - 2*1.5

This 1940 Solex has
25″ rims, with “700B”
or “28 x 1-1/2” tires.
Notice 25 = 28 – 2*1.5

Twenty five inch rims are not on any motorcycle. They are on older traditional bicycles, still common “work horse” bicycles in Europe and Asia, today. In less developed places in the world, the 28 x 1-1/2 tires, rod brake (not cables), always black, classics out number all other vehicles. The “700B” French size tire had a height of 32 or 33mm, to make an outer diameter of 700mm.

 

As you go back in time, tires were bigger and thinner, just like with automobiles.

 

 

 


Moped Tire Sizes – Dual Meaning of “Size”

A bicycle 16 inch tire fits inside a motorcycle 16 inch tire.

A bicycle 16″ tire fits inside a motorcycle 16″ tire.

The “size” of the tire has a different meaning for bicycles, than for motorcycles and cars. For bicycles, the tire size means the outer diameter of the tire. For motorcycles and cars, the tire size means rim size, which is the inner diameter of the tire. So a 20 x 2.125 bicycle tire fits a 16″ moped rim. Conversely, a 2.25 – 16 moped tire fits a 20″ bicycle rim.

Vintage motorcycle tires: After about 1969, motorcycle tires no longer used the bicycle system. From then on, “22 x 2.0” meant bicycle 18 inch rim, and “2.0 – 18” meant motorcycle 18 inch rim. Bicycles were given the even numbered rim sizes 16, 20, 22 while motorcycles were given the odd numbered rim sizes 17, 19, 21, 23, pretty much. Bicycles were given the “outer times width” syntax “22 x 2.0”, while motorcycles given the “width dash rim” syntax “2.0 – 18”. The “x” and the “-” are not interchangeable. Also the order is not interchangeable. This was a new way to tell the difference between a bicycle tire and a motorcycle tire, just by the “tire size”.

Rim size is at bead seat.

Rim size is at bead seat.

Rim measurement: You can measure any rim with a tape measure, and determine the tire size. Try to measure the rim diameter at the “porch”, where the tire sits, not the “lip” at the very edge. A 16″ rim will have a total diameter of 16.6″. So don’t count the lip.  This method settles the confusion of whether a marking or specification is using the bicycle (tire OD) or motorcycle (tire ID) system. Older mopeds often have 2.25-18 (22 x 2.25) and 2.25-19 (23 x 2.25) tires. They used the bicycle system. Modern moped-size (thin) tires, since the 1970’s, all use the motorcycle system, in the USA. Some modern electric scooters have an oddball size, 16 x 3.00. It’s a bicycle size, because a 16 x 2.25 bicycle tire fits, but wider. It’s a solid aluminum disk rear wheel, and so the inner tube valve stem must be the 90 degree type. The rim diameter at the “porch” is about 12″. A motorcycle inner tube size 3.00-12 fits perfect, but they are only available with straight valve stems. Tires and tubes for those must be purchased from the dealer or distributor of those electric scooters.