Welcome to Myrons Mopeds, remodeled, revamped, rearranged. 

  • Parts and Info by Brand: Batavus, Derbi, Garelli, Indian, Jawa, Motobecane, Peugeot, Puch, Solex, Sparta, Tomos, Trac, Vespa, engine Minarelli, engine Morini, engine Sachs, plus AMF, Colombia, Murray, Pryer, Kromag, KTM, Hercules, Kreidler, Kynast, Odyssey, Sachs, Solo, Arciero, Aspes, Baretta, Benelli, Benvenuti, Beta, Bianchi, Cimatti, Colt, Concord, Cosmo, Demm, Fantic, F. Morini, Gadabout, Gary, Gilera, Gitane, Intramotor, Italjet, Italtelai, Italvelo, Lem, Maico, Malaguti, Motobecane, Motomarina, Moto Guzzi, Moto Meteora, Motron, Negrini, Rizzato, Pacer, Safari, Snark, Testi, Velomec, Wards, Westwind, Yankee Peddler, Avanti, Hero, Kinetic, AMS, Angel, Clinton, Cuyler, Gemini, General, Jui Li, Lazer, Moprix, Paijifa, Speed Bird, Sprinter, Tsing Hua, Tym, Wheel King, Flandria, NVT, Scorpion, Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha, Carabela, Casal, Manet, Babetta, ROG. Parts found here are emblems, covers, panels, kickstands, forks, fork parts, frame parts, gas tanks, oil tanks, fenders, side rails, luggage racks, swing arms, pedal shafts, engine mounts, engine gaskets, crankshafts, engine cases, transmission parts, gears, gear shafts, clutches, cylinder and piston sets, heads, intakes, exhausts, some carburetors, some air filters, some magnetos and some flywheels. These are parts that can be used on only that one brand, pretty much. Inventory listed so far: 5%
  • Parts by Type: tires and tubes , engine top end-(pistons, piston parts, rings), engine bottom-(crankshaft nuts, bearings, seals, woodruff keys), carburetor parts (by Dellorto, Bing, Encarwi, air filters) gas tank parts (petcocks, gas caps), wheel parts (wheels, brakes, brake parts, axles, bearings, axle parts by Grimeca, Bernardi, Leleu, spokes, rims), drivetrain parts (pedals, pedal arms, chains, sprockets), controls & bars (handlebars, grips, levers, controls by Magura, Domino, PV, OSL), cable parts and cables, speedometers and parts (by CEV, Huret, Tatung, VDO, Veglia) frame parts (seats, shocks, steering parts, reflectors), electrical parts (lights, bulbs, batteries, wiring, switches, horns by Cat Eye, CEV, ULO, Merit, Peterson), ignition parts (spark plugs, coils, points, condensers, magnetos by Bosch, CEV, Dansi, Motoplat). These are parts that can be used on more than one brand, pretty much. Inventory listed so far: 25%
  • Accessories: mirrors, helmets, oils, baskets, stickers, manuals, tools, shirts. Inventory listed so far: 60%

1)  go to name index to find the brand, from any name you have. example “Foxi Deluxe”

2) go to that brand in the Parts by Brand.                               example “Austria-made … KTM”

     see the pictures and verify the identity (or try another maker).

     see the components, types, or sizes it has, that you need. example “Grimeca 90mm brakes”

3) go to the component parts offered in Parts by Type, or      example “gas cap 30mm push-in”

     scroll down to see if any are offered in that brand.          

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 What is a moped?

A 1978 Sears Free Spirit is a moped.

A moped is a lightweight motorbike that can be pedaled. Most mopeds are made in Europe. Millions were sold in the US from ’76 to ’79 after the gas shortage. By 1985 the moped boom was over, and scooters became popular.

A scooter has a floor, small tires, no pedals, and can have various sizes of engines from under 50cc to over 600cc. Most scooters are made in Asia. The smallest scooters are like mopeds in that they are both 49cc automatics that go 30 – 35 mph. A moped means MOtor with PEDals, a hybrid vehicle half way between a small motorcycle and a bicycle. Since 2000 China has flooded the US with scooters that they call mopeds, causing confusion. Some USA states require pedals and some do not. In California, a “moped” has pedals, a 2hp motor and goes 30 mph. Mopeds, scooters, and motorcycles can also be electric.

A 2008 Tomos Sprint is a moped.

Some motor driven cycles are similar to mopeds. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) classifies anything with 2 or 3 wheels and over 5 horsepower as a motorcycle, and anything with 2 or 3 wheels and under 5 horsepower as a motor-driven cycle. So what appears on the VIN plates of all four examples below is Vehicle Type: Motor Driven Cycle, since they’re all under 5 horsepower. For the purposes of this website, we break down the Motor Driven Cycle category into Mopeds, Nopeds, Scooters, or Small Motorcycles. This is because the parts inventory and service expertise at Myrons Mopeds is limited to true mopeds and some nopeds. Other types of motor driven cycles are excluded.

Examples of Motor Driven Cycles: Four Different kinds of “Honda 50″

Moped: Honda P50
49cc 1.5hp 25mph
one-speed automatic
feet go on pedals

Noped: Honda NC50
49cc 2.0hp 30mph
one-speed automatic
feet go on foot pegs

Scooter: Honda SA50
49cc 2.0hp 30mph
multi-speed automatic
feet go on floor

Motorcycle: Honda C110
49cc 4.3hp 43mph
multi-speed manual
feet go on foot pegs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shaun Strahm is the "third Myron".

Shaun Strahm is “Myron”

Myrons Mopeds is the last moped specialty shop remaining, out of over 100, in So. California since the 70’s. Owner Shaun serviced 200 mopeds per year from 1978 to 2009. Since 2010 he has slowed to only 20 per year, mostly new Tomos.

Myrons Mopeds sells parts only for mopeds and nopeds, sold in California after 1973, and compatibles. See above for meaning of “moped”.

Myrons Mopeds only does certain minor services. Service is mostly limited to components, like wheels or carbs. Please call or email first for service.

Myrons Mopeds is located in Fullerton California, near Anaheim. Hours are 10 to 6, Tuesday to Saturday, Pacific time. Walk-in, ride-in, or call Shaun at 714-992-5592, during those hours, or anytime send him an email at myronsmoped@gmail.com. 

 

Myrons Mopeds top dog Lama the aviator is greeting you. He's wearing his superhero flying suit. He can sustain high winds in comfort and safety. If you ever visit the shop, you know how he often runs the show. He rides to work about every other day. Click to enlarge.

MM top dog Lama the aviator is greeting you!
Click to enlarge.

Shaun at MM in 2011

Shaun at MM in 2011

Lama & Shaun leading Ride 76

Lama & Shaun in Ride 76
Click to enlarge.

Above, moped logos from the original 2002 black and white Mopeds A-Z Encyclopedia. Click to enlarge.

Above, moped logos from the original 2002 B & W   A to Z Encyclopedia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Below, author Daven masterfully summarizes the rise in the 1970’s, and the fall in the 1980’s, of mopeds:

Brief History of Mopeds in the USA

Author: Daven (m025001.sctcorp.com)Date: 02-22-2000 13:22 Among the many sorrows of 1995, America’s failure to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the arrival of the moped on its shores probably doesn’t rank very high. The oversight is, perhaps, even understandable. With their puny engines, fragile suspensions, and lumpy contours, mopeds were a paean to defensive driving, and as such, seem completely antithetical to what passes for a recreational vehicle today. Yet the moped was beloved. Twenty years ago, it was up there with hot tubs and Studio 54 on the top of the charts–a hallmark of its age. Since then, times have been tough. Even the recent 70s revivals have largely ignored the moped. Unresuscitated, unable to leap Travoltalike into our decade, the moped languishes in the dark recesses of the past, growing ever more obscure, fading like the leisure suit and Ben Gazzara. So quickly, before everyone who remembers the moped joins the Shah in the hereafter, indulge me, and to celebrate it. The semi-successful marriage of the motorcycle and the bicycle was first performed in gas-starved Europe at the end of WWII. Dubbed the moped (a contraction of the words motor and pedal), and basically unregulated, it flourished in the streets of Paris and Rome. The motors were very small (50 cc’s max) and of the simple two-stroke variety, so you had to mix the oil and gas yourself. But these spunky vehicles got ungodly mileage (between 100 and 200 miles per gallon). The pedals were used to help start the engine and to assist in hill climbing (although on some models, real hill climbing could be more easily accomplished by getting off the moped and walking). Those chic Europeans seemed to love them. But in America, mopeds were effectively barred by laws that classified them as motorcycles and demanded that they have foot brakes, turn signals, and various other features that they didn’t possess. We had to slake our thirst for this kind of machine with motor scooters and electric bikes. We probably didn’t even know we had such a thirst. Then in 1974, after a heavy industry lobby, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration relaxed the safety standards for mopeds. The great American moped markets were open. Laws varied from state to state, but basically, the U.S. moped’s maximum speed was set between 20 and 30 miles an hour, and drivers were forbidden to enter major highways. Beyond that, the mid-70s moped laws were pretty lax. Many states didn’t require a license, insurance, or registration; some didn’t even set a minimum operating age–which was a blessing for eager-to-get-dating 15-year-olds. (The 30 mph top speed was somewhat elusive, since most models that could achieve that kind of speed tended to shake the fillings out of your teeth when they did it. Yes, these mopeds were slow, and their engines were meek.)

They came from strange-sounding companies at first: Puch, Garelli, Batavus, and Tomos, to name a few. But once the craze was on, many of the big motorcycle manufacturers joined the fray. The Honda Hobbit, introduced in 1978, may have been the quintessential moped in name and appearance (especially name). The consumer appeal was easy to grasp: The moped was cheap, very cheap. Cheap to operate, cheap to buy, and free to insure. You could get a good one for about $350. That’s $350 for a machine that could take you anywhere you wanted to go at 20 m.p.h., and make it seem like a good time if there weren’t too many hills or big trucks around. $350! I spend about seventy bucks a week these days just on cough medicine and phone calls to the Motorcycle Industry Council, never mind transportation. Moreover, the moped was fun to ride–it put you low to the ground with some wind in your hair and moved you through traffic sort of like a motorcycle did. And in a nation delirious about all sorts of moving vehicles and the trappings thereof (truckers and CBs, the Dukes of Hazzard and CHiPs, go-carts and slot-cars) the fun little moped fit right in. Sales jumped from 25,000 in 1975 to 75,000 in 1976 to 150,000 in 1977–and then doubled again in 1978. There were moped articles in every magazine from Newsweek to Glamour. They were popular with men and women, with the young and the old (and the very old, who liked to tool around retirement communities). They were sold in drugstores and newsstands, as well as your more conventional cycle shops, and everyone was back-ordered. Some high schools began to offer Moped Ed courses to eager freshmen. Nick Nolte and Jacqueline Bisset were in a ridiculous moped chase scene in The Deep. Jimmy Carter encouraged us to buy mopeds as part of his energy conservation program. And the Department of Transportation estimated that in the 1980s, America’s roads would be covered by two- to three-million mopeds.

But the good days didn’t last. Lawmakers began to consider the safety issues raised when a vehicle with a top speed of 30 m.p.h. mingles with normal traffic (acceleration at stop lights was a big problem). There were some accidents: not as many as with motorcycles, but there were a lot more safety laws for motorcyclists–including helmet requirements. And in a moped accident, the mopeder always seemed to lose. Furthermore, the police became troubled by the fact that mopeds, with licensing optional in most states, were a good means of transportation for people who’d had their automobile licenses revoked. Resulting legislation greatly increased restrictions on the mopeds. Alas, public perception changed too: The novelty wore off, and the moped became wimpy. Sales leveled, then declined, then dropped off the map. By 1985, there were fewer than 12 moped dealers in the country, down from a late 70s peak of several hundred. Moped madness was over.

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This website is standing on the shoulders of these HTML giants:

2002-2006   Ray Fales

The founder of myronsmopeds.com and who’s idea for a barbeque in 2003 became the monthly rides.

2006-2011   Chuck Fee

The genius who wrote all new code. It was more organized, easier to use, and displayed all the rides.

2011-now    Brian Andrus

The professional encoder who created this WordPress site and makes everything work properly.