Di Blasi

August 21, 2019

Di Blasi Industriale is an Italian manufacturer of folding bicycles, tricycles, and mopeds, based in Francofonte, Sicily.

From Wikipedia  The founder of the company, Rosario Di Blasi, began development of a folding scooter in 1952, which by 1968 had evolved into a Zanetti-powered folding tricycle called the DIBLA 7 that was shown at the Turin Auto Show as a prototype. Finally in 1974 Di Blasi began production of a folding moped with a Franco Morini motor and single-speed transmission called the R2 (also known as the “Paperino”). In 1979 the model R7 replaced the R2 and featured an engine of Di Blasi’s own design as well as a multi-speed transmission. This moped has been continuously improved and is still in production as the R7E. It has been used by the Polizia Stradale, the Traffic Police division of the Italian National Police, aboard their helicopters. The R7 is sold by Di Blasi of America as the “Express.”

Di Blasi of America is in Florida USA. Here is the website: https://www.diblasi.com/

Di Blasi mini-cycles (mopeds): These are collapsible mini-cycles that can fit in a bus, airplane, train, boat or car. Although they lack pedals, they are legally mopeds in many, but not all, US states. They fold into an incredibly compact size. When you load or unload it you get to say “hand me that motorcycle” with a devious smile!

Parts: All models have 4.00-5″ tires. R7 models (R7WT, R7TB, R7E, R7ES) have the same engine top end (cylinder, piston and head), compatible with 1970-80 Motobecane AV7 moped engines like on US models.

 


1974 to 1979

1974-79 Di Blasi R2

Morini S5K2 parts

 

R2: The Di Blasi R2 “Paparino” had a Franco Morini S5K2 engine, 50cc limited-power kick-start one speed automatic. Top speed 22 mph (35 km/h). It had a Dellorto SHA 14/12 carburetor. It folds up super small in just 5 seconds!

 

 

Di Blasi R2 parts

 

1974-79 R2 had frame numbers up to 3999.

Engine parts are in Brands/Italy/Morini Motor.
Carburetor parts are in Parts/Carburetor/Dellorto.
Lights are different than US-model mopeds.
Control parts are in Parts/Controls/Domino

 

 

 

 

 


1979 to 1989

1979-82 Di Blasi R7ST and 1982-89 R7WT

 

R7: The Di Blasi R7ST had a new engine, the M1, designed and made by DiBlasi. It was made to be compact and light weight. Bore and stroke were 39 x 41.8 mm, comp ratio 8.7, horsepower 1.25. It had an expanding pulley with a V-belt (a variator) like a French moped, kick start, and a 415 chain final drive with 9 x 42T sprockets. The cylinder, piston, head, and most of the crankshaft look the same as 1970’s Motobecane AV7. It had a Dellorto SHA 14/12 carburetor with size 54 jet. Carburetor parts are offered in Parts/Carburetor/Dellorto. manualmachine.com has the 1985 R7WT parts manual and the 1985 R7WT owners manual .

1979-82 R7ST had frame numbers 4000 to 13999.
1982-89 R7WT had frame numbers 14000 to 19999. 

Lighting Equipment Versions
1. The “EU” version was for most of Europe and the world. It had a 6 volt 18 watt magneto. The lights were smaller and less watts. No brake light. One left-side handlebar lights/horn/engine-stop switch.
2. The “US” version was also for Great Britain (GB) and Switzerland (CH). It had a 6 volt 25 watt magneto. The lights were bigger. There was extra equipment for a brake light. Two handlebar switches, right-side engine stop, and left-side lights/horn. These were the CEV “diamond” type.

Magneto
US version had a CEV 6932 points magneto (CEV#04212), with external ignition ground, external spark coil. The blue wire must be grounded to have spark. This was to meet the legal requirement that the headlight must not get dim when the brake light goes on. Source coils are 04308 lights and 04307 ignition.
EU version had CEV 6931 (CEV #04394), with internal ignition ground, external spark coil. Source coils are 04233 lights and 04277 ignition in the parts list, but at least some have an 04235 ignition spark coil and no external spark coil. All the other parts (points, condenser, flywheel, etc) are the same as the USA version.

Di Blasi magneto part numbers are CEV-Pagani numbers with the prefix PG (for Pagani-CEV). Parts are in Parts/Ignition, Magneto/CEV magneto.

 

A1. R7WT and A2. R7WT-US

B. R7WT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C1. R7WT and C2. R7WT-US

D. R7WT

E. R7WT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F2. R7WT-US and F1. R7WT

G1. R7WT and G2. R7WT-US

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1989 to 1997

1989-97 Di Blasi R7TB

1. R7TB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. R7TB engine

3. R7TB (40W) and R7TB-US (60W)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Di Blasi R7TB had the following improvements. The ignition became electronic and maintenance-free. The lights generator made more volts and more watts. Together with a solid-state electronic voltage regulator (#2004 in the parts picture) this made the lights not get too bright when going fast, yet not get too dim when stopped at a light idling. There are two lighting equipment versions shown in the parts pictures, a 12 volt 60 watt and a 12 volt 40 watt.

1990-95 R7TB had frame numbers 20000 to 24999.
1995-98 R7TB had frame numbers 25000 to 29999. 

The piston pin is referred to as TCK13, which must mean it is 13mm like a Motobecane AV7. The piston rings are 39mm like Motobecane. Spark plug NGK BR6HS (resistor type).

Lighting Equipment Versions 
1. The “EU” version was for most of Europe and the world. It had a 12V 40W magneto #725. The lights were the same. No turn signals. No brake light. One left-side handlebar lights/engine-stop switch #792.
2. The “US” version was also for Great Britain (GB) and Switzerland (CH). It had a 12V 60W magneto #2002. Turn signals. There was extra equipment for a brake light. Two handlebar switches, right-side engine stop/turn #794, and left-side lights/horn #792. These were CEV integrated black plastic switches that fit into the all-black Domino controls.

 

 

 


1997 to now

1997-on Di Blasi R7E

1. R7E and R7E-US

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. R7E

3. R7E and R7E-US

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Di Blasi R7E drive belts

1997-on R7E has frame numbers 30000 and up. 
R7ES 
has a stainless steel frame, rust-resistant.

The Di Blasi R7E has the following improvements. Cogged belt final drive, instead of chain. The engine with variator is the same. The engine pulley drives the V-belt, which drives a rear pulley, which drives the cogged belt, which drives the rear wheel. For the cogged belt #281 see Parts/Drivetrain/Belts. Newer and flat style CEV tail light.

 

 

 

 

Lighting Equipment Versions 
1. The “EU” version was for most of Europe and the world. 12V 60W magneto #2002 and lights were the same. Turn signals. No brake light. Two Two CEV integrated handlebar switches, right-side engine stop/turn #794, and left-side lights/horn #792. 
2. The “US” version was also for Great Britain (GB) and Switzerland (CH). 12V 60W magneto #2002. Turn signals. There is extra equipment for a brake light. Two handlebar switches, right-side engine stop #2112, and left-side lights/horn/turn #2111. These are CEV? integrated black plastic switches that fit into the all-black Domino controls.

2019 Di Blasi Express (R7E-US) line up. Some new models have square headlights.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2011 to now

2011-on Di Blasi R70

 

The Di Blasi R70 is electric. Instead of a gas tank it has a long detachable battery.