Handlebars and Grips

July 14, 2014

Contents:  1. Specifications   2. Aftermarket Moped Handlebars   3. OEM Handlebars 

xxxxxxxxx 4. Other Handlebars   5. Grips


1. Handlebar Specifications

Natural angle: Close your eyes, clench your hands in a fist, relax, and put both arms forward and down a little. That is the natural position of your hands. They form an angle, called θf, viewed from the front, and another angle, called θt, viewed from the top. Handlebars are all close to the average natural position of human hands. 

Positioning: Clamp-on handlebars can rotate in the clamps. During installation the rider chooses the best clamping position, for comfort and control. Most handlebars (except Clubman) are positioned with the rising part going straight up when viewed from the side. A rider with short arms might prefer a more rearward position, while a rider with long arms might want a more forward position. 

Flipping (inverting): Any clamp-on handlebar can be flipped over (inverted). But most will feel wrong and strain the wrists. Of the handlebars shown below, only the Clubman and Drag bars can be flipped over, and still feel right.

Dimensions are width, height, rise, clamp length, control length, pullback.

Dimensions: Six lengths can completely describe a handlebar, without the need for angles. Here the side-view angle θs, and the top-view angle θt, are calculated from the lengths R, H, P, L, W, and C.

tan(θt) = 2*P / (W-C)

sin(θf) = (R-H) / L  

Measuring: When measuring the dimensions, the end points are at the centers of the tubes, not the edges. The handlebar is placed on a flat table. With the rises vertical, the rise and height are measured from the center of the bar, straight down to the table, with 1/2 of the bar width subtracted (-0.4 inch). With the rises horizontal, the pullback is measured similarly. 

Height: Looking from the front, most handlebars, especially low ones, slant down slightly going outward, at an angle θf, because the height is less than the rise. On some handlebars, the height is greater than the rise, and θf is negative.

Pullback: Looking at most motorcycle bars from the top, the bars slant rearward, at an angle θt, because the pullback is greater than zero. When the pullback is zero, θt becomes zero. Cruiser bars are for comfort and have a large pullback, where the bar ends point more towards the back of the bike. Drag bars are for high powered acceleration, and have a small pullback for control and grip.

2D or 3D: When the pullback is zero, the handlebar is 2-dimensional and will lay completely flat. Otherwise, most 4-bend (non-Drag) bars are 3D and do not lay flat on a table. 2D handlebars are simpler to make, but don’t feel “right”, except maybe at one particular position. 3D handlebars are more complicated to make, but will feel “right” in a range of positions.  

Width: Wider handlebars allow better control. Off road bikes have wider bars. Narrow bars have less control, but are more aerodynamic for better fuel economy or higher top speed, and can squeeze through smaller spaces, like in between stopped cars.

Rise: High rise handlebars are taller, and put the hands higher. This can position the rider’s torso in a more upright position, for helping with back pain. Higher bars allow better control when standing up, like when jumping or hitting pot holes. Low rise handlebars put the rider leaning more forward. That reduces wind drag for higher top speed or better fuel efficiency.

Control length: Motorcycle handlebars need about 3 inches more control length than bicycle handlebars. They have thumb-operated levers or buttons, in addition to the finger-operated hand levers. Motorcycles have a twist throttle and a hydraulic brake on the right that takes up space. For motorcycles the minimum control length is roughly 8 inches. For mopeds it is about 6 inches. For bicycles it is about 5 inches. Any handlebar that has extra control length, can be cut shorter, up to the minimum control length, to reduce it’s width. 

Clamp length: The center straight area needs to be at least as long as the clamps. Motorcycles have wider handlebar clamps than mopeds. Here is a table of moped handlebar clamp spacings:

xxxxxxxxx xx inner  outer
Tomos A55 xx 1.7″ xx 3.1″  only this fork has enough inner space for bicycle bars with a 1″ x 1.7″ center bulge
Puch Maxi xx 1.55 xx 3.2
Hercules xxxx 1.2 xxx 2.4
Peugeot 103 x 1.2 xxx 2.3
Cimatti xxxx none xxx 2.4
Motobecane x 1.5 xxx 2.7

Applications: Not all mopeds can accept clamp-on “universal” handlebars. Some mopeds have bolt-on handlebars, where there are plates welded to the bar that bolt to the fork. Some mopeds have stem-mounted handlebars, where there is a long neck that goes inside the fork, held by a wedge bolt.

Thickness: Most modern 7/8 handlebars are  0.875 inch = 22.2 mm.

Vintage metric handlebars, are 0.863 to 0.866 inch = 21.9 to 22.0 mm.

The dual standard can sometimes cause problems.

22.0 controls on 22.2 bars: Wedge type controls, such as Domino, for 22.0 bars cannot fit on 22.2 bars. Wedge type controls do not clamp, but instead press a cone into the bottom of the handlebar. 1960’s, 70’s and 80’s “vintage” Domino controls have a fixed size hole, 22.0 mm, for 21.9 bars.

22.2 controls on 22.0 bars: Original vintage handlebars 22.0, with 1970’s Magura clamp type controls, require a strip of aluminum can under the clamp, to hold solid onto the handlebar. Otherwise the throttle slips around the bar. 1990’s and 2000’s “modern” Domino wedge type controls have a 22.3 mm hole, that works fine on either modern 22.2 or vintage 22.0 bars.

 


2. New Aftermarket Handlebars for Mopeds

Bikemaster

Bikemaster new replacement handlebars for mopeds are made in chrome or powder coated black.

The chrome ones are all 0.869″ = 22.07 mm thick, less than 7/8 inch

The thinner chrome fits into all clamp type, all modern wedge type, and most vintage wedge type controls. Some vintage 22.0 mm controls require sanding of the high places on the 22.07 mm chrome handlebar. Often the bar is to wide at the sides, but not at the top and bottom. It is difficult not to scratch the exposed area.

The black ones are 0.88 to 0.89″ = 22.4 to 22.6 mm, more than 7/8″

The thicker black powder coated bar fits Magura clamp type controls, but can interfere with wedge type controls. With Italian made Domino wedge type controls, the thicker 0.89″ (22.6mm) bar does not fit into the fixed-size hole (modern 22.3 or vintage 22.0 mm).

The black powder coating can be sanded off, to reduce the thickness. But it is difficult to not scratch the exposed area. 

  

 

GP Touring bars chrome 110520 $25
GP Touring bars black 110521 N/A

GP Touring Bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″
xxxxxx width  30″
xxxxxx height  2.0
xxxxxxxx rise  2.3
xclamp length  5.0
control length  8.2
xxxx pull back  4.7

These bars have plenty of  control length, 8 inches. Most mopeds only need 6 inches. So each end can be cut 2″, to reduce the overall width by about 3″, from 30 to 27″.  

 

 

Superbike bars chrome 110510 $25
Superbike bars b? 110511 $25

Superbike Bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″
xxxxxx width  29″
xxxxxx height  3.0
xxxxxxxx rise  2.0
xclamp length  4.2
control length  9.0
xxxx pull back  3.1

These bars have plenty of control length, 9 inches. Most mopeds only need 6 inches. So each end can be cut 3″, to reduce the overall width by about 5″, from 29 to 24″.  

 

 

 

Daytona bars chrome 110550 $25
Daytona bars black 110551 $25

Daytona bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″
xxxxxxx width  29″
xxxxxx height  5.0
xxxxxxxx rise  3.0
xclamp length  4.8
control length  8.2
xxxx pull back  3.3

These bars have plenty of control length, 8 inches. Most mopeds only need 6 inches. So each end can be cut 2″, to reduce the overall width by about 3″, from 29 to 26″. 

 

 

 

 

Drag bars chrome 110500 $22
Drag bars black 110501 $22

Drag bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″
xxxxxx width  28″
xxxxxx height  0.0
xxxxxxxx rise  0.0
xclamp length  6.0
control length  9.5
xxxx pull back  2.6

These are the only two-bend handlebar. All others have four bends. That makes them cost less. Most mopeds only need 6″ of control length, so 3.5″ can be cut from each end, to reduce the width by about 6″, from 28 to 22″.

 

 

 

Clubman bars chrome 110540 $28
Clubman bars black 110541 $28

Clubman bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″
xxxxxx width  28″
xxxxxx height  0.0
xxxxxxxx rise  3.3
xclamp length  5.5
control length  10.0
xxxx pull back  5.9

These bars are shown inverted, with the rises going upward. In this position the bars are higher, but still at an angle that feels right. Normally they are installed with the rises going down and forward. That position is what racing bikes have, for reduced wind drag.

For mopeds that only need 6″ of control length, each end can be cut 4″, to reduce the width by about 6″, from 28 to 22″.

 

 

 

 


3. OEM Handlebars

Most Original Equipment Manufacturer handlebars are available in a range of conditions. All are straight, unless noted. Some are new, some good used, and some are pitted, peeling or scratched. Some have tiny scuffs from being jostled around in parts bins. They are priced accordingly. Photos of actual choices are available, by email. 


Cimatti

Cimatti bars
3110 $20-$45 good used

1975 Cimatti City Bike

Cimatti 3110 bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  24″
xxxxxx height  9.6
xxxxxxxx rise   9.3
xclamp length  3.0
control length  6.2
xxxx pull back  6.5

These bars have a plate and a clamp. The clamp has the strength to hold the bar, while the plate keeps it in that one position. The clamp will still hold if the plate is cut off. Without the plate the bar position is adjustable. Curiously this Cimatti handlebar is made by Garelli. See the tilted G logo?

Cimatti bars with welded-on levers
2940 $70 very good used

Cimatti 2940 bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  23″
xxxxxx height  9,5
xxxxxxxx rise  10.0
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.2
xxxx pull back  7.3

 

 

 

 


Garelli

Garelli bars-with-stem
500.204.5100 $35 rusted (shown)

1976 Garelli Eureka Flex

Garelli 1975-79 bars-with-stem

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  22.5
xxxxxx height  7.9 plus stem
xxxxxxxx rise  8.3 plus stem
xclamp length  —
control length  5.8
xxxx pull back  5.1

These bars are on 1975-79 Garelli mopeds. They can adjust up and down, by how far the stem is inserted.

 

 

 

No photo available. None available.

1978 Super Sport XL

Garelli 1977-79 high bars-with-stem

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  23?
xxxxxx height
xxxxxxxx rise
xclamp length  —
control length  5.8?
xxxx pull back

These bars are on 1977-78 Garelli Supersport XL and others.

 

 

Garelli bars-with-plate
xxxxxx.xxxx $40 good used (shown)

1978 Garelli Super Sport LTD

Garelli 1978-79 bars-with-plate

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  23″
xxxxxx height  11.1
xxxxxxxx rise  10.2
xclamp length  —
control length  5.7
xxxx pull back  3.6

These bars are on certain 1978-79 models. The bottom of the handlebar has a chrome steel plate that says Garelli. The chrome handlebar plate bolts to the painted fork top plate. The fork top plate is made of stamped sheet steel. For these bolt-on bars the fork top plate was made too thin, causing most to crack near the edges of the handlebar plate. Garelli soon realized this problem, and stopped making the bars-with-plate design in 1979.

 

Garelli clamp-on high rise bar
507643.5100 n.a. not available

1978 Garelli VIP

Garelli 1978-86 clamp-on bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width
xxxxxx height
xxxxxxxx rise
xclamp length
control length
xxxx pull back

These bars are on most 1980-86 Garelli, US models, and 1978-79 VIP and LTD (mag wheel) deluxe models. For about one year in 1978-79 all three handlebar designs were on Garelli mopeds, handlebar-with-stem, handlebar-with-plate, and clamp-on handlebar. But by 1980, all models had the clamp-on handlebar design, with strengthened fork top plate that did not crack easily.

 


Gitane

1978 Gitane Confort

Gitane bars-with-plate
052181 $40 good used (shown)

Gitane bars-with-plate

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  23.5
xxxxxx height  5.4
xxxxxxxx rise  6.6
xclamp length  —
control length 6.2
xxxx pull back  6.5

The 1977-80 Gitane mopeds (US models) had this bolt-on handlebar. Many Gitanes (made in Italy by Testi) were from Southern California.

 

 


Honda

Honda NC50 bars  $50 (shown)

Honda NC50 Express bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  23.5
xxxx xx height  9.5
xxxxxx xx rise  8.3
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  3.0

These clamp-on bars are on 1987-83 Honda NC50 Express and PA50 Hobbit. They have large holes for the electrical wires to go inside the handlebar. They also have small holes for the little pins that hold the controls in a fixed position. They also have rubber-grommet covered holes for the throttle and choke or decomp cable. So altogether there are 7 holes.  

 


Kreidler

Kreidler bars
355.0301 $45 good used

Kreidler bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  24″
xxxxxx height  8.7
xxxxxxxx rise  8.8
xclamp length  3.2
control length  6.3
xxxx pull back  3.5

These clamp-on bars are on Kreidler Flory MP9 and MP19 mopeds. The handlebar has a short tab under the center, that fits into a slot in the fork top plate.

 

 


Motobecane

Motobecane clamp-on bars
21143 $20 – $40 used, straight

1977 Motobecane 50V

Motobecane 50V bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  21.5
xxxxxx height  6.3
xxxxxxxx rise  6.2
xclamp length  3.5
control length  5.5
xxxx pull back  4.6

These bars are on 1975-1980 Motobecane mopeds, US models 7, 40, 50, 50V, Moby, Le Moped.

 


Peugeot

Peugeot 103 bars
56320 (not available)

1977 Peugeot 103 LVS

Peugeot 103LVS bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width
xxxxxx height
xxxxxxxx rise
xclamp length
control length
xxxx pull back

These bars are on Peugeot 103LS and 103LVS models. They are so scarce that no sample was available for a photo and measurement.

 

 

 

1980 Peugeot 103 SPB

Peugeot SP bars
52711 $70 new old stock

Peugeot 103SP bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ 21.9 mm
xxxxxxx width  22.3
xxxxxx height  7.5
xxxxxxxx rise  7.0
xclamp length  2.8
control length  6.5
xxxx pull back  4.2

These bars are on 102SP and 103SP models. They have thin wall tubing, for light weight, but they bend easily. So unbent originals are scarce.

 

 

 


Puch

Puch 1969-77 Maxi bars-with-stem
349..232..1000 $35 used, pitted

1977 Puch Maxi
bars-with-stem

Puch 1969-77 bars-with-stem

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ (21.9mm)
xxxxxxx width  23″
xxxxxx height  6.0 plus stem
xxxxxxxx rise  6.0 plus stem
xclamp length  —-
control length  5.5
xxxx pull back  2.8

These bars are on early Puch Maxi models, 1969 to 1977. The height is adjustable by the position of the stem.

 

1977 Puch Maxi
with clamp-on bars

Puch Maxi 1977-86 clamp-on bars
321..532..3011 see below for prices

Puch 1977-86 bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ (21.9mm)
xxxxxxx width 24.2″
xxxxxx height  8.8
xxxxxxxx rise  8.6
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back 4.3

These clamp-on bars are on 1978-79 Maxi Luxe, Newport, Maxi II, and 1980-86 Maxi, Maxi Luxe, Newport II.  

 

Puch Maxi fork top plates
L for bars-with-stem $15 – $10
R  for clamp-on bars  $35 – $30

1. $25 straight, clean, but pitted
2. $25 straight, clean, but pitted
3. $25 straight, clean, but pitted
4. $10 straight, badly pitted
5. $20 straight, clean, pitted
6. $20 straight, clean, pitted
7. $10 straight, badly pitted
8. $15 straight, but pitted
9. $75 straight, new or like new
10. $50 straight, almost no pitting
11. $60 straight, no pitting, like new
12. $25 straight, dark blue sparkle

 

 

1985 Puch Maxi,
with tall bars

Puch tall bars
321..432..3011 $30 used scratched

Puch tall bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.866″ 22.0 mm
xxxxxxx width 25.7
xxxxxx height  10.6
xxxxxxxx rise  10.3
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  4.1

These bars are the same as Maxi bars but taller. They are on 1977-78 Sport, Sport MkII, and 1984-86 Maxi, Maxi Sport LS, Maxi Sport LS 2. They are heavy because of thick wall tubing. 

 

1980 Magnum II

Puch tall cross bars
321..832..3011 $25-$35 used pitted

Puch tall cross bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ (21.9mm)
xxxxxxx width 25.7
xxxxxx height  10.6
xxxxxxxx rise  10.3
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  4.5

These bars are the same as tall bars, but have a curved crossbar. They are on 1979-86 Sport, Sport MkII and 1980 Magnum II.

 

1978 Magnum MkII

Puch Magnum cross bars
321..132.8012 $70 new

Puch low cross bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.862″ (21.9mm)
xxxxxxx width 25″
xxxxxx height  8.6
xxxxxxxx rise  8.4
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  4.3

These bars are similar to Maxi bars, but shorter and with a curved crossbar. They are on 1978-79 Magnum XK, Magnum MkII.

 

 


Sparta

1980 Sparta Buddy

Sparta handlebars, 8 available, from
$20 scuffed or faded, to $60 like new

Sparta bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.871″ (22.1mm)
xxxxxxx width 22.8
xxxxxx height  6.3
xxxxxxxx rise  7.3
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back 5.6

 

There are several mopeds with these handlebars: Sparta Foxi GT, Sparta Buddy, Sparta Lucky, Sparta Flying Dutchman, and others. These bars are the same as Batavus VA, Batavus Starflite, Batavus Regency bars, but with more pullback. They are made in Holland with high quality chrome that resists rusting.

 


Tomos

1979-86 Tomos controls
(made by Magura)

1986-91 Tomos controls
(made by Domino)

1992-08 Tomos controls
(made by HR)

< These Tomos controls do not have a post, so the handlebar does not need holes.

 

 

 

 

 

2001-07 Tomos controls
(made by Domino)

2008-13 Tomos controls
(made by TBS)

< These Tomos controls have a post that goes into a hole in the handlebar. When changing handlebars, holes have to be drilled. The holes have to be in a particular place to make the levers the same, and at the correct angle. 

 

 

 

 

 

1979 Tomos Bullet

Tomos 1974-1979 bars with stem
209.178 $45 used (shown)

Tomos 1974-1979 bars-with-stem

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.867″ (22.0mm)
xxxxxxx width  23.4
xxxxxx height  7.0
xxxxxxxx rise  6.8
xclamp length  —-
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  3.2

This stem type handlebar is what bicycles have. Older mopeds were more like bicycles. The stem can be positioned to make the bars higher or lower.

 

 

 

1979-1991 Tomos bars chrome
214810 $20 rusty, to $60 almost new

1987 Tomos Bullet

Tomos 1979-1991 bars

xxx thickness ∼7/8″ 0.867″ (22.0mm)
xxxxxxx width 24.3
xxxxxx height  7.6
xxxxxxxx rise  7.0
xclamp length  3.5
control length  6.5
xxxx pull back  3.8

 

 

 

1985 Golden Bullet

Tomos 1985-08 bars black
222888 $25 new (no holes)
222888 $15-$20 used

Tomos 1985-2008 bars

xxx thickness  ∼7/8″ 0.0875″ (22.2mm)
xxxxxx width  24″
xxxxxx height  7.5
xxxxxxxx rise  7.9
xclamp length  4.0
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  3.7

These bars do not have the holes for 2008-13 controls.

 

 

2010 Tomos ST

Tomos 2008-13 bars black
242199 $25 new (with holes)
242199 $20 used slightly

Tomos 2008-2013 bars

xxx thickness  ∼7/8″ 0.0875″ (22.2mm)
xxxxxx width  24″
xxxxxx height  7.5
xxxxxxxx rise  7.9
xclamp length  4.0
control length  6.0
xxxx pull back  3.7

These bars have the holes for late-model Domino or TBS controls.

 

 

Tomos Streetmate bars chrome
236416 $30 used (with holes)

2005-12 Streetmate

Tomos Streetmate bars

xxx thickness  ∼7/8″ 0.0872″ (22.2mm)
xxxxxx width  26.2″
xxxxxx height  4.2
xxxxxxxx rise  5.6
xclamp length  4.3
control length  7.7
xxxx pull back  5.7

These have holes for late Domino or TBS controls.

 

Tomos Revival bars chrome
242042 $40 (with holes)

2002-12 Tomos Revival

Tomos Revival bars

xxx thickness  ∼7/8″ 0.0872″ (22.2mm)
xxxxxx width  25.0″
xxxxxx height  6.6
xxxxxxxx rise  8.1
xclamp length  4.3
control length  7.5
xxxx pull back  6.7

These have holes for late Domino or TBS controls.

 

 


4. Other Handlebars

Bicycle 7/8 bars with 1″ center 

Wald bicycle bars

2009 Tomos Sprint
with Wald 3346 bars

Wald 3346 bars chrome
3346 $15 (made in USA)

xxx thickness  7/8″ 0.0876 = 22.3mm
xxxxxx width  20.3″
xxxxxx height  5.0
xxxxxxxx rise  4.8
xclamp length   3.5 with 1″ x 1.7″ center
control length   6.0
xxxx pull back  2.5

On most older mopeds the clamps are too close to the 1.7 inch long center bulge. On 2008-13 Tomos, the forks are wider than vintage mopeds forks, and the handlebar clamps are spaced 1.7″, far enough apart . So the Wald 3346 handlebar fits pretty much only modern Tomos mopeds. See the table of moped fork clamp spacings above. For 2001-13 Tomos controls made by Domino or TBS, holes must be drilled into the handlebar, because those controls have posts. But the fresh chrome gives a classic look, and the height is sensible.

 


Bicycle 7/8 bars with 7/8″ center

 

 

 

 


5. Grips

Size: Almost all small motorcycle left (L) grips are inside diameter 22mm (7/8″), to fit the bare handlebar. Right (R) grips are ID 25mm (1″) to fit the throttle twist tube. Moped grips are shorter than most motorcycles. The left side doesn’t matter, but the right side does. When the left grip is longer, the lever housing (perch) is moved over to make room. When the right grip is longer, it must hang over the end, or possibly make the throttle stick. Standard motorcycle grips are 115 to 130mm (4½ to 5¼”) long, or more. Vintage moped grips are short, 100 to 115mm (4″ to 4½”). There’s not a big selection in the shorter size.

 

#  pt# left/right length  description xxxxxx  price  applications and remarks


01 414300  R x 100  Magura waffle (used)   $30  used in good condition, rare, maybe others

02 414310  L x 100  Magura waffle (used)    $5  orig on Puch Sport, MkII, 80’s Tomos Bullet

03 494170  R x 105  Magura black ribbed    $20  orig on Puch, Peugeot, Batavus, others

04 494200  L x 105  Magura black ribbed     $2  orig on Puch, Peugeot, Batavus, see below

05 D22 xxx L x 100  Domino ribbed (used)  $12  orig on most Italian 1970’s, see below

05 D21 xxx R x 100  Domino ribbed (used)  $15  used in good condition, scarce, maybe others

06 21654x  R x 100  Motobecane rib grey    N/A for reference

06 21655x  L x 100  Motobecane rib grey    N/A for reference

07 PG761C  set 105  Pro Grip Superbike cut $12  #13 modern gel grips shortened by 20mm

08 PVright  R x 105  PV ribbed 70’s Italian   N/A  original on some 70’s Italian, see below

09 PGO767  set 116  ProGrip Scooter grip   $12  modern gel replacement

10 494080   set 115  Magura block 80’s      $12  new fresh, original on Puch Magnum

11 1973.82  set  115  Domino octagon 80’s   $15  new fresh in original Domino package

12 PVleft    L x 112  PV ribbed 70’s Italian    N/A  original on some 70’s Italian, see below

13 PGO761  set 125  Pro Grip Superbike gel $12  aftermarket modern gel

14 utahgrp  set 120  large foam black ends  $10  aftermarket vintage, new in sealed package

15 170766  set 125  lg foam chrome ends   $20  close to orig. on Tomos Revival, Streetmate

16 232876  R x 125 lg foam chrome ends   $13 original Tomos, end caps break off

16 232877  L x 125 lg foam chrome ends    $13 original Tomos, end caps break off

00 223712  R x 118  round dome bumps     $16  orig on 1992-08 Tomos

00 223711  L x 118   round dome bumps     $16  orig on 1992-08 Tomos

 

 

 

OEM grips: Original equipment grips, some new and some used, are offered for “correct” restorations, when modern replacement grips are not desired. Many original grips are not for sale, but are shown for reference. OEM grips are usually made by the controls maker. Below are the major moped controls makers.

Domino controls

Domino controls are made in Italy. They are on most Italian mopeds, such as Arciero, Aspes, Baretta/Piccoli, Beta, Bianchi, Cimatti, Concord/Fantic, Demm, Gadabout, Garelli, Malaguti, Motobecane Sebring, Motomarina, Motron, Negrini, Pacer/Italtelai, Snark, late 80’s Tomos, and Vespa/Piaggio. 1970’s Domino controls are silver with chrome (stamped stainless steel) levers. Early 80’s were black, most with integrated diamond shape switches and chrome levers. 1970’s and early 80’s had black ribbed grips 100mm long. Late 70’s and early 80’s had waffle style grips. Early 80’s had basketball texture grips. Mid to late 80’s had all black controls with built-in switches and octagon style grips (also called square because they are shaped like a square with shaved off corners). See Domino 

Magura controls are made in Germany. They were on most non-Italian European mopeds, such as Batavus, Columbia, Hercules/Sachs, JC Penney, Kreidler, Kromag, Kynast, Murray, Peugeot, Puch, Solo/Odyssey, Sparta/Foxi, 70’s to early 80’s Tomos, and Trac. Magura moped grips evolved like Domino. 70’s Magura controls were silver with silver levers (stamped aluminum) with black ribbed grips. Late 70’s to early 80’s controls were black with silver levers, and waffle style grips, early 80’s was block style, or basketball texture. See Magura

Motobecane controls are made in France. They are on 1970’s to early 80’s Motobecane mopeds. The 70’s had silver with chrome levers, 80’s were black with chrome levers. They had built-in (integrated) switches. 70’s grips were grey ribbed 100mm long, 80’s were black ribbed 100mm.

PV controls are made in Italy. They are on some 1970’s Italian mopeds, such as Benelli, Califfo, Cosmo (some), Intramotor Gloria, Moto Guzzi, Testi/Gitane and Velomec. They are silver with black plastic levers. The grips are black ribbed, very close to Domino, but they have a PV logo. The right PV grip is 105mm, but the left one is longer 112mm. See Other controls

Taiwan controls are made in Taiwan. They are on Taiwan mopeds such as General, Lazer, Indian, Angel and others. They are cast aluminum housings and levers, with built-in switches and buttons, made the same as early 70’s “baby” Hondas, such as PC50. The 1970’s ones had black ribbed short grips 100mm long. The ribs are small and have gaps. See Other controls